Harrison Oakes Selected for Cox Capital Internship Program

Cox Capital Management is pleased to welcome UMass Lowell junior Harrison Oakes as the newest research intern. Originally from Reading, MA, Harrison has maintained a near perfect GPA while majoring in Business Administration with concentrations in Finance and Accounting. He is a Dean’s List student and a member of the Beta Sigma Gamma Honors Society. Further, Harrison has previously completed internships with MFS Investment Management in Boston, MA and Community Teamwork in Lowell, MA. Over the next few months, Harrison will get hands on experience researching individual companies, learning portfolio management strategies, and analyzing economic data. A graduate of Reading Memorial High School, he was captain of the wrestling team during his senior year and his hobbies include skiing and running.

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Team News: Ethan Brown Obtains CFA Charter; Anne Lee Joins Cox Capital Management

Cox Capital is pleased to report good news on two fronts: Portfolio Manager Ethan Brown has recently obtained his CFA Charter, and Anne Lee has joined the Cox Capital team as the firm’s new Office Manager.

Ethan joined Cox Capital in 2015 as a research analyst after obtaining his MBA from UMass Lowell. He began working toward his CFA charter in 2016, and passed all three levels of the exam in each subsequent year. Over this time, he accumulated the required work experience, and the CFA Institute approved his charter as of January 2019. “We are thrilled to have a CFA Charterholder on our staff,” said Cox Capital Management founder Bill Cox. “It demonstrates our commitment to building a qualified portfolio management team and highlights the strong research-driven culture of our firm.”

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The Loser’s Game: Why Being Conservative Can Help You Win At Investing

Throughout my whole life I’ve always enjoyed playing tennis. I loved being competitive, and I played in all the local tournaments growing up – and even went on to play in both high school and college. In my later years, I read a book called “Extraordinary Tennis for the Ordinary Tennis Player” by Simon Ramo, who was a scientist and statistician.  His book analyzed how tennis matches were won or lost. The book would have served me well when I was competing years ago because it brought attention to the concept of risk and return. The author highlights the fact that in expert and professional tennis about 80% of the points are “points won” simply because of superior talents by the participants. This means that in professional matches, the points won are typically accomplished by brilliant passing shots and by very few misses. In our mere mortal amateur world, however, the opposite is the case. About 80% of the points won in an amateur match are accomplished by “points lost” – i.e. points that are caused by errors, missed shots or double faults by the opponent. In other words, just being consistent and conservative can help the lesser player win a match against a formidable foe with a reckless game plan.

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